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#1 OFFLINE   the_dank_one

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 03:30 PM

this is from another thread at another site i slapped together (not wrote).. all videos i include in any posts are for the learning impaired.

 

 

Spider mites are garden pests that are mainly found living on the under sides of the leaves of plants. They usually spin protective silk webs around the leaves and puncture the plant cells to feed themselves, causing great damage. The most obvious signs of spider mites infestation are small brown or yellow dots and small strands of silk on the leaves of a plant, along with leaf discoloration. A spider mite infestation needs to be treated on an urgent basis, since it tends to grow too quickly. Though miticide or pesticide is the quickest solution, you can also opt for home-made insecticide, so as not to cause much harm to your plants. In the following lines, we have provided information on how to kill spider mites.

How to Get Rid of Spider Mites 
First of all, you need to make sure that you have spider mites in your garden. Scorched looking leaves and leaf discoloration are amongst the most obvious signs. After you have seen these signs, take a white sheet of paper and hold it under a branch. Gently shake or tap the branch. Look at the paper. If it has slow-moving specks on it, your problem is surely that of spider mites.
In case you feel that the problem of spider mites is not too great, you can wait for sometime, to see whether it gets solved on its own. Insects like lady beetles, predatory mites and big-eyed bugs are natural predators of spider mites and can easily get rid of the problem for you. Since these predators can be killed by insecticides, make sure to spray them carefully and save the beneficial insect species.
One of the major conditions supporting the outbreak of spider mites on plants is dryness. So, make sure to give your plants adequate water, especially during the dry periods. In case of sturdy plants, you can even hose them down periodically. This will help in removing the dust on their leaves and thus, restrain the spider mite webbing that holds the eggs and leads to the break.
In order to retain moisture in plants, try to keep them away from late afternoon sun and arid weather. This solution can work mainly in the case of potted plants, which you can remove from direct sunlight and put under shade. In case of plants that are attached to the ground, try to provide them shade in any other way. For indoor plants, you can draw the shades or move them out of direct sunlight. Using a humidifier next to the plants is another option.
In case you feel that the problem is not going away by natural means, make your own insecticide and get rid of the spider mites. For the purpose, add 5 tbsp liquid dish detergent to 1 gallon water. Repeated sprayings will be required to kill the mites. While spraying, ensure that you do use it on the undersides of the leaves. This is because spray will only kill those spider mites that it comes in contact with.
Another homemade insecticide comprises of alcohol and water. For making the same, add 1 part alcohol to 1 part water i.e. use both in equal quantities. Since rubbing alcohol is poisonous, it will kill the mites on contact. At the same time, it evaporates quickly and thus, will do little damage to your plant. Make sure to use the spray on the entire plant, paying emphasis on the bottoms of the leaves.
If you feel that even homemade insecticide is not helping you kill spider mites, you have the option of using a miticide or other pesticide on your plants. They should be applied once every five days, till all signs of spider mite infestation go away. Remember that it is quite difficult to get rid of spider mites, even when you use pesticides. So, before using such harmful substances, weigh the pros and cons first.

http://lifestyle.ilo...mites-2510.html
 
A few months of drought is a natural part of spring here, but those dry months often result in a plague of spider mites that ravage our favorite house and garden plants.

Spider mites are not insects, but teensy eight-legged vegetarians. Under a magnifying glass they appear as red or green slow-moving spiders. If you smear a white piece of paper against the underside of a leaf infested by them, their bodies would be crushed and fine red or green lines would appear. This paper test is the fastest way to confirm that spider mites are using your plants as a source of water, food and shelter.

Spider mites hate rain, so living on the dusty undersides of leaves protects them and gives them a nursery for their eggs to hatch. A thin film of their delicate webs, especially visible in miniature roses, plus fallen leaves, is a classic indicator that your plants have been invaded.

And wouldn't you know that many of your favorite plants are their favorites, too: night blooming jessamine, dracenas, kentia and areca palms, miniature roses, plumbago, basil, pyracantha, cassava, crotons, junipers and citrus. First you will notice dead branches in your junipers or stipple marks on leaves marking the punctures made by their feeding frenzy. Bad cases will coat the leaves with that fine web that gives added protection to their eggs.

Chemical miticides can sometimes provide short-term control, but all these years of spraying Kelthane and other treatments have created spider mites immune to chemical warfare. These pesticides can still decimate populations of the beneficial mites that help break down organic matter and that prey on spider mites, plus wipe out good bugs such as ladybugs and lacewings and those cute little lizards that eat so many bad bugs.

One homemade "miticide" recipe calls for mixing 1 gallon of water, 1/2 gallon of buttermilk and 1 cup of flour. Spray this all over a plant. This mixture suffocates mites by the thousands, but it could get expensive if used all over the landscape. My favorite solution is old-fashioned water.

Watering restrictions allow for hand watering if a shut-off nozzle is on the end of the hose. A sharp coarse spray directed at an infested plant will blast off mites, their eggs and their young by the thousands, leaving them to die on the soil or mulch. Be sure to aim the water stream at the undersides of the leaves. Weekly watering does double duty by eliminating harmful dust from leaves and by giving all those beneficial critters a few drops to quench their thirst. (Baby lizards can eat quite a few spider mites.)

- John A. Starnes Jr., born in Key West, is an avid organic gardener and rosarian who studies, collects, cultivates and hybridizes roses for the diverse regions of Florida. He can be reached at johnastarnes@msn.com

 

advertising for these company's is not my job these are just some ideas.

neem

predators.



#2 OFFLINE   the_dank_one

the_dank_one

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 03:32 PM

What about this recipe I got out of an old HT?

8-10 garlic cloves
1 jalapeno pepper
1 to 2 teaspoons ground cayenne pepper
Put in blender and fill w/water. Blend well & strain thru cheesecloth. Add 1/8 tsp. Ivory dish detergent per quart of liquid, spray on plants.

Nonchemical, nontoxic, common household items. Just don't rub your face after making/spraying.

 

 

(credited...hooper_x)

 

 

 

The best thing that has worked for me so far has been the cooperative use of 2 home made products.

First...

Pepper spray: Simmer 5-6 Habanero peppers that have been finely chopped (paying extra attention to breaking open the seeds to get the good stuff inside) for each pint of water. Keep in mind to only simmer the peppers as boiling them will start the breaking down process and decrease the potency of your spray. Let cool to room temperature and strain the solids from the juice. This spray can be kept for an unreal amount of time if it is refrigerated, but if left out for like a week or more will make one of the most rancid smells. But if you havent cleaned up after yourself for over a week then Id say you have a different problem on your hands altogether.

Precautions: This is extremely spicy stuff! Depending on the sensitivity level of your skin you may want to wear gloves but I dont seem to have an issue as, I kind of like how extremely cleansing it is for my pores. A face mask is absolutely necessary, and some may find it to be harsh even with the mask. Turn off your fans, try not to get it in your eyes, try not to breathe it in, but the thing about this stuff is that it is safe to consume so as long as you mind your sensitive areas and prevent yourself from suffocating then youre fine.

Key point: The pepper spray can be used infrequently, as Ive noticed it makes the fan leaves pretty spicy to the taste even days after you spray it. It doesnt leave much residue that I can tell so it has to make eating a pain in the ass for them without suffocating your plant too much. This one effect alone will slow them down drastically.

Now for the second substance...

Peppermint spray: 3 teaspoons of Dr. Bronners Peppermint soap, 3 teaspoons of vegetable oil (I am going to see if the cold pressed hemp oil will work in a more superior manor than canola or soybean ect.), and fill the rest of a gallon jug with filtered water (I was reminded to mention that we use filtered water for EVERYTHING, I am not someone who is okay with variables I am unaware of. Variables that could cause substances to break down in a different way than I have intended them to).

Key point: Dr. Bronners promotes the use of their soaps for pest control, so we are off to a great start in general. This substance is going to further aid in what youve begun with the pepper spray...drying those fuckers out until theyre a water-less corpse. It will break down the membrane of the exoskeleton, causing them to be vulnerable, and suffocate as if they werent starved enough from hating the taste of your plants already. Remember to shake the peppermint spray super frequently as the oil will settle, and the oil is used to prolong the effects of the peppermint.

I like doing it this way because if you tried to use only the pepper spray, it would get too belligerent cause you would have to do it pretty often depending on your infestation level. It doesnt kill the eggs so you would need to be spraying regularly, which gets extremely annoying with it being that spicy. So we have the peppermint spray which smells amazing and feels very cool and refreshing, and when Im feeling meditative about it Ill just use a Q-tip sprayed in peppermint and manually wipe them off 1 by 1.

Thats about all I got so far. I refuse to dose my plants with hateful chemicals, and I havent had any success whatsoever with neem and on top of that I am not a fan of how much more residue the neem leaves than my regimen. My absolute favorite part about these 2 sprays is that they can be kept around indefinitely, which gives you a sense of security seeing as the MOMENT you see a mite you can go grab your holistic weapons and spray.

 by leeroyjenkinsss (01/17/12 12:28 AM)

 

I have tried those, canola and soybean, plus sesame seed, and neem. I just tried a few weeks back, the hemp oil. So far i have been impressed, with the hemp oil. I am using now citrus, Organic Soap(Grapefruit), instead of peppers. I first tried sunlight soap with the hemp oil, i made it too strong for a 4 week flowering plant.. Still the flowering plant is lookin better and did kill the mites, right soon to be harvested now. Was great on my veg and moms. Now I will be playing to see, how less of a mix I need, to kill off mites.

by SeaOfGreen 


PS.... I have 3 parts on Hemp Oil Vs Mites on that You Tube
_________________________
Member of the Organic Mafia. VAN.ISL Division(Hempology 101 Team)

Edited by the_dank_one, 19 April 2013 - 03:35 PM.


#3 OFFLINE   the_dank_one

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 03:41 PM

I haven't had spider mites indoors for over 5 years. It's due mostly to how clean my environment is and my closed-loop air system.
Anyways!
There's a product that has been getting mad reviews at our shop lately. THE best method to absolutely DESTROY spider mites without using dangerous pesticides such as AVID and Floramite. The product is called Mighty Wash and is actually 98% water! What makes it effective is that the water is "charged". The way it works is when the spray hits the spider mites or eggs it begins to dry them out. It essentially "kills on contact". The pests do not need to eat the product, just come into contact with it.
DEATH TO MITES!!!
note: the spray is not to be diluted. Use as is right out of the bottle. Also, you absolutely MUST use a regular plastic sprayer bottle. Any sprayer with a metal tip at the end will destroy the charge in the water and make it useless.

Peace, E1 (Enlightened1)

 

 

I've tried neem for over a year 3 different types, after months of spraying every 3 days. I stop and within a month there back again. Now I've order some green lace wing eggs, they thier larvea supposedly are the best mite removers. I'm planning one application of 1000 eggs each month for 3 months. I wanted to use praying mantia, but everywhere ran out of the eggs before I could order.


A friend tried lady bugs they died because he didnt put sugar water or any other sustenance out for them. I kind of thought that strange also, if the lady bugs are eating spider mites why would they need sugar water. If the lacewings dont work I'm moving to predatory mites next!
(continued.)
Its funny I was a little disappointted after the first application of green lascewing eggs, but something told me to give it another shoot so 2 weeks after the first release, I released another 1000 lacewing eggs. Its been almost one month after the first application and I cant find a spider mite. Its amazing!!!

I've been battling these bastards for over a year, and finally I may have a permanent solution. Now that I have the upper hand I will order 1000 green lacewing larvae per month for the rest of the year. I'm quite sure I will have destroyed all remnants of the infestation by then.
 
by frodo baggins
 
...I'm late on this one but may I suggest Agrogreen 4-1-1. It is an botanical that was designed as an organic pesticide but since it isn't regulated by the Canadian PMRA, it cannot actually be called that hence the 4-1-1 designation. 

I know it works better than neem oil or water/soap. The pepper and peppermint sprays sound keen. Agrogreen also gives the herb a bit of a boost. You can mix this stuff from 100:1 to 400:1 but I have had good luck at 200:1. Smells good as well.

The original manufacture is no longer around but I still see it sold. 

cheers
Grassy.
 
 
With extreme malice. mad.gif 

I just started using nicotiana rustica (sacred aztec tobacco). It grows super easy in my veg room and traps all kinds of flying insects keeping them off my plants. For direct application I make a tea from some of the rustica leaves and spray the underside of the plants and the top of soil in the container. Im sure nicotine poisoning must be one hell of a way to die. 

I have some seed pods drying. If anyone wants to use this method hit me up and Ill pass on some seeds to ya.
Nicotiana_rustica_002.JPG
 
by sarva.


#4 OFFLINE   the_dank_one

the_dank_one

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 03:47 PM

my original clones a couple of years ago came with thrips on them, and last year spider mites were brought into my house from the outside yard.

I used AVID in conjunction with a wetting agent, applying three times for each outbreak.
This killed 100% of the thrips, and 100% of the spider mites. My plants were in veg, most people would not apply AVID if the plants were flowering if they intended to smoke it themselves.

AVID. it is poison. And it works for it's intended purpose.

 

 

by weedmen

 

 

Simple as this.......

http://en.m.wikipedi...g/wiki/Spinosad

1257900-p-m.jpg 

100% organic and OMRI listed....you know longer have to fear the armored lil bandits...haha!!
_________________________
Proud member Organic Mafia
Portland Oregon
by innercityseed.
 
From http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20150928

"The spinosyns have a unique mechanism of action (MOA) involving disruption of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors."

Overall this product looks like a good alternative to some other products... but I probably couldn't afford to be exposed to it, I have a particularly sensitive cholinergic system.
_________________________
Defending the People's Right to Know since 2000
by spectralmagic
 
 
THIS is everything minus the personal comments please feel free to add your videos,experience and recipe's.
 


#5 OFFLINE   jebus

jebus

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:06 PM

tried these ?



#6 OFFLINE   jebus

jebus

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:08 PM

this is from another thread at another site i slapped together (not wrote).. all videos i include in any posts are for the learning impaired.

 

 

Spider mites are garden pests that are mainly found living on the under sides of the leaves of plants. They usually spin protective silk webs around the leaves and puncture the plant cells to feed themselves, causing great damage. The most obvious signs of spider mites infestation are small brown or yellow dots and small strands of silk on the leaves of a plant, along with leaf discoloration. A spider mite infestation needs to be treated on an urgent basis, since it tends to grow too quickly. Though miticide or pesticide is the quickest solution, you can also opt for home-made insecticide, so as not to cause much harm to your plants. In the following lines, we have provided information on how to kill spider mites.

How to Get Rid of Spider Mites 
First of all, you need to make sure that you have spider mites in your garden. Scorched looking leaves and leaf discoloration are amongst the most obvious signs. After you have seen these signs, take a white sheet of paper and hold it under a branch. Gently shake or tap the branch. Look at the paper. If it has slow-moving specks on it, your problem is surely that of spider mites.
In case you feel that the problem of spider mites is not too great, you can wait for sometime, to see whether it gets solved on its own. Insects like lady beetles, predatory mites and big-eyed bugs are natural predators of spider mites and can easily get rid of the problem for you. Since these predators can be killed by insecticides, make sure to spray them carefully and save the beneficial insect species.
One of the major conditions supporting the outbreak of spider mites on plants is dryness. So, make sure to give your plants adequate water, especially during the dry periods. In case of sturdy plants, you can even hose them down periodically. This will help in removing the dust on their leaves and thus, restrain the spider mite webbing that holds the eggs and leads to the break.
In order to retain moisture in plants, try to keep them away from late afternoon sun and arid weather. This solution can work mainly in the case of potted plants, which you can remove from direct sunlight and put under shade. In case of plants that are attached to the ground, try to provide them shade in any other way. For indoor plants, you can draw the shades or move them out of direct sunlight. Using a humidifier next to the plants is another option.
In case you feel that the problem is not going away by natural means, make your own insecticide and get rid of the spider mites. For the purpose, add 5 tbsp liquid dish detergent to 1 gallon water. Repeated sprayings will be required to kill the mites. While spraying, ensure that you do use it on the undersides of the leaves. This is because spray will only kill those spider mites that it comes in contact with.
Another homemade insecticide comprises of alcohol and water. For making the same, add 1 part alcohol to 1 part water i.e. use both in equal quantities. Since rubbing alcohol is poisonous, it will kill the mites on contact. At the same time, it evaporates quickly and thus, will do little damage to your plant. Make sure to use the spray on the entire plant, paying emphasis on the bottoms of the leaves.
If you feel that even homemade insecticide is not helping you kill spider mites, you have the option of using a miticide or other pesticide on your plants. They should be applied once every five days, till all signs of spider mite infestation go away. Remember that it is quite difficult to get rid of spider mites, even when you use pesticides. So, before using such harmful substances, weigh the pros and cons first.

http://lifestyle.ilo...mites-2510.html
 
A few months of drought is a natural part of spring here, but those dry months often result in a plague of spider mites that ravage our favorite house and garden plants.

Spider mites are not insects, but teensy eight-legged vegetarians. Under a magnifying glass they appear as red or green slow-moving spiders. If you smear a white piece of paper against the underside of a leaf infested by them, their bodies would be crushed and fine red or green lines would appear. This paper test is the fastest way to confirm that spider mites are using your plants as a source of water, food and shelter.

Spider mites hate rain, so living on the dusty undersides of leaves protects them and gives them a nursery for their eggs to hatch. A thin film of their delicate webs, especially visible in miniature roses, plus fallen leaves, is a classic indicator that your plants have been invaded.

And wouldn't you know that many of your favorite plants are their favorites, too: night blooming jessamine, dracenas, kentia and areca palms, miniature roses, plumbago, basil, pyracantha, cassava, crotons, junipers and citrus. First you will notice dead branches in your junipers or stipple marks on leaves marking the punctures made by their feeding frenzy. Bad cases will coat the leaves with that fine web that gives added protection to their eggs.

Chemical miticides can sometimes provide short-term control, but all these years of spraying Kelthane and other treatments have created spider mites immune to chemical warfare. These pesticides can still decimate populations of the beneficial mites that help break down organic matter and that prey on spider mites, plus wipe out good bugs such as ladybugs and lacewings and those cute little lizards that eat so many bad bugs.

One homemade "miticide" recipe calls for mixing 1 gallon of water, 1/2 gallon of buttermilk and 1 cup of flour. Spray this all over a plant. This mixture suffocates mites by the thousands, but it could get expensive if used all over the landscape. My favorite solution is old-fashioned water.

Watering restrictions allow for hand watering if a shut-off nozzle is on the end of the hose. A sharp coarse spray directed at an infested plant will blast off mites, their eggs and their young by the thousands, leaving them to die on the soil or mulch. Be sure to aim the water stream at the undersides of the leaves. Weekly watering does double duty by eliminating harmful dust from leaves and by giving all those beneficial critters a few drops to quench their thirst. (Baby lizards can eat quite a few spider mites.)

- John A. Starnes Jr., born in Key West, is an avid organic gardener and rosarian who studies, collects, cultivates and hybridizes roses for the diverse regions of Florida. He can be reached at johnastarnes@msn.com

 

advertising for these company's is not my job these are just some ideas.

neem

predators.

got some of these commin on wednesday 



#7 OFFLINE   jebus

jebus

Posted 04 June 2013 - 05:00 PM

http://www.hydro-gar.../spidermite.htm



#8 OFFLINE   jebus

jebus

Posted 04 June 2013 - 05:03 PM

http://www.hydro-gar...nstructions.pdf



#9 OFFLINE   KidneyStoner

KidneyStoner

    Hash Head

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 01:13 AM

SNS 217 has saved me twice! Anyone else tried it?

#10 OFFLINE   Sunbiz1

Sunbiz1

    Hash Master

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 02:19 PM

 

Having viewed this, am wondering if raising room humidity during flowering periods would cause other issues?.



#11 OFFLINE   Llama

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 06:11 PM

 

What about this recipe I got out of an old HT?

8-10 garlic cloves
1 jalapeno pepper
1 to 2 teaspoons ground cayenne pepper
Put in blender and fill w/water. Blend well & strain thru cheesecloth. Add 1/8 tsp. Ivory dish detergent per quart of liquid, spray on plants.

Nonchemical, nontoxic, common household items. Just don't rub your face after making/spraying.

 

 

(credited...hooper_x)

 

 

 

The best thing that has worked for me so far has been the cooperative use of 2 home made products.

First...

Pepper spray: Simmer 5-6 Habanero peppers that have been finely chopped (paying extra attention to breaking open the seeds to get the good stuff inside) for each pint of water. Keep in mind to only simmer the peppers as boiling them will start the breaking down process and decrease the potency of your spray. Let cool to room temperature and strain the solids from the juice. This spray can be kept for an unreal amount of time if it is refrigerated, but if left out for like a week or more will make one of the most rancid smells. But if you havent cleaned up after yourself for over a week then Id say you have a different problem on your hands altogether.

Precautions: This is extremely spicy stuff! Depending on the sensitivity level of your skin you may want to wear gloves but I dont seem to have an issue as, I kind of like how extremely cleansing it is for my pores. A face mask is absolutely necessary, and some may find it to be harsh even with the mask. Turn off your fans, try not to get it in your eyes, try not to breathe it in, but the thing about this stuff is that it is safe to consume so as long as you mind your sensitive areas and prevent yourself from suffocating then youre fine.

Key point: The pepper spray can be used infrequently, as Ive noticed it makes the fan leaves pretty spicy to the taste even days after you spray it. It doesnt leave much residue that I can tell so it has to make eating a pain in the ass for them without suffocating your plant too much. This one effect alone will slow them down drastically.

Now for the second substance...

Peppermint spray: 3 teaspoons of Dr. Bronners Peppermint soap, 3 teaspoons of vegetable oil (I am going to see if the cold pressed hemp oil will work in a more superior manor than canola or soybean ect.), and fill the rest of a gallon jug with filtered water (I was reminded to mention that we use filtered water for EVERYTHING, I am not someone who is okay with variables I am unaware of. Variables that could cause substances to break down in a different way than I have intended them to).

Key point: Dr. Bronners promotes the use of their soaps for pest control, so we are off to a great start in general. This substance is going to further aid in what youve begun with the pepper spray...drying those fuckers out until theyre a water-less corpse. It will break down the membrane of the exoskeleton, causing them to be vulnerable, and suffocate as if they werent starved enough from hating the taste of your plants already. Remember to shake the peppermint spray super frequently as the oil will settle, and the oil is used to prolong the effects of the peppermint.

I like doing it this way because if you tried to use only the pepper spray, it would get too belligerent cause you would have to do it pretty often depending on your infestation level. It doesnt kill the eggs so you would need to be spraying regularly, which gets extremely annoying with it being that spicy. So we have the peppermint spray which smells amazing and feels very cool and refreshing, and when Im feeling meditative about it Ill just use a Q-tip sprayed in peppermint and manually wipe them off 1 by 1.

Thats about all I got so far. I refuse to dose my plants with hateful chemicals, and I havent had any success whatsoever with neem and on top of that I am not a fan of how much more residue the neem leaves than my regimen. My absolute favorite part about these 2 sprays is that they can be kept around indefinitely, which gives you a sense of security seeing as the MOMENT you see a mite you can go grab your holistic weapons and spray.

 by leeroyjenkinsss (01/17/12 12:28 AM)

 

I have tried those, canola and soybean, plus sesame seed, and neem. I just tried a few weeks back, the hemp oil. So far i have been impressed, with the hemp oil. I am using now citrus, Organic Soap(Grapefruit), instead of peppers. I first tried sunlight soap with the hemp oil, i made it too strong for a 4 week flowering plant.. Still the flowering plant is lookin better and did kill the mites, right soon to be harvested now. Was great on my veg and moms. Now I will be playing to see, how less of a mix I need, to kill off mites.

by SeaOfGreen 


PS.... I have 3 parts on Hemp Oil Vs Mites on that You Tube
_________________________
Member of the Organic Mafia. VAN.ISL Division(Hempology 101 Team)

 

 

 8-10 garlic cloves
1 jalapeno pepper
1 to 2 teaspoons ground cayenne pepper
Put in blender and fill w/water. Blend well & strain thru cheesecloth

 

 

Add tomatoes, chopped onion, cilantro and serve with corn chips!



#12 OFFLINE   the_dank_one

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 11:15 AM

SO TRUE Llama... might as well make salsa that day too lol 2 birds one stone lol



#13 OFFLINE   the_dank_one

the_dank_one

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 11:24 AM

one super duper thing that is working outside on my buddies tomato's is STRAIT UP GHOST PEPPER SPRAY LOL.. HE USES GHOST PEPPER POWDER AND WATER  LOL...

NOT ONLY DOES IT WARD OFF PESTS AND DEER BUT IT WORKS GOOD AS HELL ON THE NEIGHBOR KIDS AND THEIR GRUBBY LIL FINGERS ONE TASTE OF A UNWASHED TOMATO AND THEY RUN HOME CRYING!!! HAHAHAHA

 

here are the hottest peppers on the face of the planet if your gonna make a REAL hot pepper spray!

Top Ten Hottest Peppers In The World 2014 carolinareaper-seeds.jpg 1. Carolina Reaper   2,200,000 SHU

There is nothing normal about this pepper. It was bred for heat and that it is. Oddly enough this pepper has excellent flavor as well. The Carolina Reaper is officially the Worlds Hottest Pepper as ranked by Guinness Records. Coming Soon LIVE Carolina Reaper Plants. Reserve yours now!

 

$15.00 $10.00 Add to cart

Moruga-Scorpion.jpg 2. Moruga Scorpion   2,009,231 SHU

Straight from the depths of hell, Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Blend, AKA Moruga Scorpion, is a rare sought after pepper that was only just recently discovered

 

$15.00 $10.00 Add to cart

Brain_Strain_small1-300x294.jpg 3. 7 Pot Brain Strain  ~1,900,000 SHU

The Brain Strain, characterized by its bumpy/wavy skin that closely resembles a human brain. This pepper not only looks like brain, but sets it on FIRE! This pepper has insane heat!

 

$14.00 $9.00 Read More

Primo_small.jpg 4. 7 Pot Primo   ~1,900,000 SHU

The 7 Pot Primo is very distinctive with its long skinny “tail”. Some recent peppers cultivators have tried to replicate this look because the tail is just terrifying. When you just look at this pepper, you know it’s going to be INSANELY hot.

 

$10.00 Read More

douglah-300x179.jpg 5. 7 Pot Douglah    1,853,936 SHU

Well renown in the pepper community as one of the hottest peppers with the best flavor. You can’t go wrong with fresh, dried, or powdered Douglah on any food. Also known as 7 Pod Douglah, Chocolate 7 Pod or the 7 Pot Brown.

 

$9.00 $8.00 Read More

TrinidadScorpButchT.png 6. Trinidad Scorpion Butch T     1,463,700 SHU

Current Guiness Books of World Records holder. No doubt it’s insanely hot, but other peppers have been proven to be hotter.

 

$9.00 Read More

naga_viper_pepper-194x300.jpg 7. Naga Viper   1,349,000 SHU

Extremely rare pepper cultivated in the UK. Combination of many different peppers and years of cross pollination created this variety of “Super HOT” pepper

 

$10.00 Read More

Trinidad-7-Pod-Barrackpore-173x300.png 8. Other 7 Pot Varieties  1,000,000 – 1,300,000 SHU

(SR Strain, Jonah, Yellow)     

Barrackpore

$8.00 Add to cart

7 Pot Red (Giant) 

 

$10.00 $5.00 Add to cart

Chilli_Bhut_jolokia-143x300.jpg 9. Bhut Jolokia (Ghost Pepper)   1,041,427 SHU

The most famous “Super Hot” due to the amount of press it has received in the past. It exploded in popularity on YouTube and other social sites where pepper heads ate whole Ghost Peppers as a challenge. This is the first pepper to scientifically test over 1 million scovilles. Many mistakenly still believe it is the World’s Hottest. As you can see, it is far from it.

 

$9.00 $6.00 Read More

 

 

naga_morich.jpg Naga Morich      1,000,000 SHU

Regional pepper of India, similar to Bhut Jolokia.

 

$9.00 $6.00 Add to cart

dorset-naga.jpg Dorset Naga      1,000,000 SHU

Regional pepper of India, similar to Bhut Jolokia, smoother skin than Naga Morich.

 

$9.00 $6.00 Read More

Red-Savina.png 10. Red Savina Habanero    500,000 SHU

Back in the early years of super hots, the Red Savina Habanero was KING! He has since been dethroned and many peppers have passed him in heat. The Red Savina just barely makes the Top 10, but does so in fashion with its great flavor and extreme heat.

 

$7.00 $5.00 Add to cart



#14 OFFLINE   joe mac

joe mac

Posted 17 July 2014 - 03:04 AM

ok so if you wanna kill mites....virtually any mite, and many other insects species DEAD! and you are in veg. 

 

abamectin works wonders......I can't take total credit for this info tho...Al B. Fuct  is the one whom I learned this from...

 

but I will say that with one application my SM problems dissapeared. 

 

 

oh and probably most importantly, lower RH and increase air flow substantially if indoors......nothing is more effective while combating pests as eliminating their preferred environmental conditions ime. 

 

sm's thrive in high humidity and more importantly, areas with little to know air circulation.....so my rule of thumb is that even before chemical or organic treatments correct the environmental conditions FIRST! 

 

so for me, The absolute first and easiest/cheapest thing is to increase air circ.....In the event of a SM onslaught I like to at LEAST TRIPLE the current air flow....followed by dropping rh to below 50% 

 

only after these conditions are met do I worry about treatments

 

 

fwiw


Edited by joe mac, 17 July 2014 - 04:32 AM.


#15 OFFLINE   the_dank_one

the_dank_one

    not only is it a name its a lifestyle!

  • Inactive Stoner
  • 1,980 posts

Posted 17 July 2014 - 10:21 AM

YEAH BUDDY!!! killer post exactly!!!!

guess we should mention!

leave and enter naked and strait to shower also lol..

if you feel like your skin is crawling it most likely is when infested lol.







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